Study and creation of terrariums and vertical garden

JAR, BOTTLE AND TERRARIUM GARDENING

The principles involving there 3 types of gardening are more (or) less same: the only difference is in the shape & style of the container.

  • A jar made of glass having tall sides with (or) without lid is good for bottle gardening as this Conserves moisture. The jar has wide mouth than bottle…..
  • When placed horizontally it offers more space for land scaping….
  • bottle gardening is a novel may of growing certain moisture loving indoor plants which may be otherwise impossible to grow in a dry house..
  • It is as much a curiosity as a “ship in a jug”.
  • The contrariness which is large enough to hold plants can be used for this purpose.
  • Even a wide mouthed wine –glass can grow tiny plants. Fish aquarium can also serve this purpose though this can’t be considered as bottle gardening. Rather it should be included in through gardening.

Jar, bottle and terrarium gardening:

            The principles involving these three types of gardening are more or less the same; the only difference is in the shape and style of the container. A jar made of glass having tall sides with or without lid is good for bottle gardening as this conserves moisture. The jar has a wider mouth than a bottle. A bottle should be wide at the bottom with taller sides and a narrow but wide enough (2-3 cm diameter opening) mouth for enabling the plants to be inserted. A terrarium is a glass bowl of 25-30 cm diameter having an air-tight lid. One advantage of bottle is that it can be placed either vertically or horizontally on a stand. When placed horizontally it offers more space for landscaping.

            Bottle gardens may be called as miniature greenhouse in which Lilliputian landscapes are planned. Any size of bottle, a jar, or a jug is suitable for gardening provides these are made of clear glass. Bottle gardening is a novel way of growing certain moisture-loving indoor plants, which may be otherwise impossible to grow in a dry house. To a layman, is may become a matter of conjecture, how such large-sized plants could have gone inside through such a narrow mouth. It is as much a curiosity as a ‘ship in a jug’. These types of gardening offer a good display on a table, a stand, or a well-lit window. Besides jars, bottles and terrariums any other clear glass container which is larger enough to hold plants can be used for this purpose. Even a wide-mouthed wine-glass can grow tiny plants. Fish aquariums can also serve this purpose though this cannot be considered as bottle gardening, either it should be included in trough or box gardening.

            Certain tools are to be improvised before the planting job is undertaken. These are:

  1. Trowel: An old tea spoon from the kitchen is shortened by breaking the handle to half and then attached to a 60 cm long bamboo cane.
  2. Fork-cum-rake: A narrow old table fork is improvised for the purpose in the same way.
  3. A pair of tongs: Some metal tongs are cut down and fitted to two 60 mm long bamboo canes.
  4. Rammer: A 60 cm bamboo cane is fixed with adhesive in the central hole of cotton reel or any similar material.

Planting procedure:

            Bottle garden plants need a reasonable amount of light but direct sunlight will overheat the plants. One good idea is to convert a bottle garden after planting into a table lamp, to ensure proper lighting. But in such a case, the plants should remain accessible for future care. The lamp is to be fitted in the neck of the bottle, with the help of a clamp.

            Often it may be necessary to remove a dead leaf or a overgrowth from a plant in the bottle garden. This can be achieved by attaching a broken razor blade to a stick.

            Mealy bugs and aphids my sometimes infect bottle plants. A stick with some cotton at one end soaked in alcohol is inserted in the bottle and brushed against the insects.

Vertical garden:

            This is new concept of gardening has developed in Switzerland and is not normally found in Indian gardens. This consists of a wooden frame of thickness varying from 15 cm to 30 cm depending upon convenience. The height and the breadth of the frame varies depending upon the available space. The broader faces are enclosed with wire netting whereas the two vertical sides (i.e., the thickness of the frame) and the bottom are covered with wooden flats. The top is kept open. Sphagnum moss or coarse peat is pressed within the wire frame which serves as the growing medium. It is possible to grow many dwarf flowering and foliage plants in such frames provided the medium is supplied with nutrient and watered regularly.

            This type of gardening has some advantages. In cities people living in flats have very little space for the conventional type of gardening, but can easily afford to put up a vertical garden. A vertical garden can be shifted from place and even used as an ornamental partition in the drawing- room. Since the aeration and the drainage of the medium are perfect, the shadow-rooted plants needing very little anchorage will grow well. The vertical garden should be planted with either sun-loving dwarf and trailing flowering annuals such as alyssum, pansy, nasturtium etc., or shade –loving foliage or flowering plants such as Semperflorens begonias, rex or ornamental – leaved begonias,

African violets, Filtonia, Peperomia, Oxalis, Zebrina pendula etc., on the broader sides, which are expected to grow horizontally with the tendency to go vertical. On the vertical top also some plants may be planted. A single vertical garden should not have a mixed planting, i.e., a combination of shade-loving and sun-loving plants. Plants are planted on both faces of the frame. The vertical garden is provided with legs on the sides to enable it to stand on its own. A rot-resistant wood such as teak should be used for the frame and in addition should also be treated with a rot-resistant chemical such as cuprinol.

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